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Christmas Puppies


We're days away from Christmas and you might be scrambling to find that "perfect gift". A puppy sounds like a good idea, right? Wrong!

Puppies aren't a good gift. Puppies are a commitment. They take time and effort and thought. Sure, puppies are cute, but they don't stay cute and cuddly forever (unless you get one of those froo-froo breeds LOL).They grow. They eat. They mess in the house. They chew up things they're not supposed to. They take training to become well behaved pets. You can't just throw them outside and expect them to be trained. The commitment is an ongoing thing. Buying a puppy should involve hours, days, even months of thought and care. Buying a puppy shouldn't be spur-of-the-moment kinda deal.

If you're really wanting to buy someone a puppy for Christmas, make them a coupon of sorts. Then, after Christmas, take them to your local shelter (or a responsible breeder) and let them pick one out. You could even give them a grab bag of all the things they'd need for their new puppy as a gift; a bed, collar and leash, food and water bowl and toys.




The Forgotten Dogs Christmas

'Twas the night before Christmas when all through the house,
not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.

The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
in hopes that St. Nick soon would be here.

The children all nestled snug in their beds,
with no thought of the dog filling their head.

Mom in her kerchief and I in my cap,
knew the dog was cold, but didn't care about that.

When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter.

Away to the window I flew like a flash,
figuring the dog was free of his chain and into the trash.

The moon on the breast of the new fallen snow,
gave luster of mid-day to objects below.

When what to my wondering eyes should appear,
but Santa Claus with his eyes full of tears.

He unchained the dog once so lively and quick,
last years Christmas present now painfully sick.

More rapid than eagles he called the dogs name,
and the dog ran to him, despite all his pain.

Now Dasher, now Dancer, now Prancer and Vixen,
On Comet, on Cupid, on Donner and Blitzen.

To the top of the porch, to the top of the wall,
let's find this dog a home where he will be loved by all.

I knew in an instant there would be no gifts this year,
for Santa had made on thing very clear.

The gift of a dog is not just for the season,
we had gotten the dog for all the wrong reasons.

In our haste to think of the kids a gift,
there was on important thing we had missed....

A dog should be family and cared for the same,
you don't give a gift, then put it on a chain.

And I heard him explain as he rode out of sight,
"You weren't give a gift, you were given a life."
Author Unknown



If you do decide to give a puppy as a gift, make sure it's what they really want. 

Comments

  1. Love this one. (Goliath here)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I really like this. Thank you for sharing. It is so very true... unfortunately. Santa said it perfectly, "You weren't given a gift... You were given a life."

    ReplyDelete

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