Skip to main content

Must Rehome Today!!

Must Re home Today!!!! $10 OBO

Please help! After 2 long years of being on a waiting list for a dog, we have been notified by breed rescue that, at long last, our number has come up and...
WE ARE HAVING A PUPPY!!

We must get rid of our children IMMEDIATELY because we just know how time consuming our new little puppy is going to be and it just wouldn't be fair to the children. Since our little puppy will be arriving on Monday, we MUST place the children up for adoption this weekend!

They are described as:

One male -- his name is Tommy, Caucasian (English/Irish mix), light blonde hair, blue eyes. Four years old. Excellent disposition. He doesn't bite. Temperament tested. Does have problems with peeing directly in the toilet. Has had chicken pox and is current on all shots. Tonsils have already been removed. Tommy eats everything, is very clean, house trained and gets along well with others. Does not run with scissors and with a little training he should be able to read soon.

One female -- Her names is Lexie, Caucasian (English/Irish mix), strawberry blonde hair, green eyes quite freckled. Two years old. Can be surly at times. Non-biter, thumb sucker. Has been temperament tested but needs a little attitude adjusting occasionally. She is current on all shots, tonsils out, and is very healthy and can be affectionate. Gets along well with other girls and little boys but does not like to share her toys and therefore would do best in a one child household. She is a very quick learner and is currently working on her house training. Shouldn't take long at all.

We really do LOVE our children so much and want to do what's right for them. That is why we contacted a rescue group. But we simply can no longer keep them.

Also, we are afraid that they may hurt our new puppy.

I hope you understand that ours is a UNIQUE situation and we have a real emergency here! They MUST be placed into your rescue by Sunday night at the latest or we will be forced to drop them off at the orphanage or along some dark, country road. Our priority now has to be our new puppy.

$10 rehoming fee but price is very negotiable.

Is this acceptable? No, so why do some of us feel that it's okay to do the same thing to our loyal pets? Pets that haven't done anything wrong, that any "problems" you may be having could be due to lack of training and are generally easily fixed.

If you can't dedicate 15 years to a dog and aren't willing to fight to keep him/her, don't get one! I understand that sometimes life gets in the way and there's not much choice BUT sometimes there's a way; get a trainer or a behaviorist. You owe it to your dog that didn't ask to be with you; you owe them the chance to stay with the only family they may have ever known.

If you find this funny but also get the seriousness of it please don't hesitate to share this, the more people that see it hopefully the more will stop and think before they rehome their dog.

(Updated: I posted this "ad" on Craigslist. I received an email about it and this what it said:
"Are you serious? Please send me pics."
Surely they caught the "joke" of it but sadly you never know!)

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Great Dane Standard Through the Ages Part III ~1976~

The 1976 Official Illustrated Standard
Revised & Edited by The Great Dane Club of America, Inc. Written text AKC approved August 10, 1976 Illustrated by Donald E. Gauther - Great Dane Breeder & Judge Copyright, 1972


1. GENERAL CONFORMATION (a) GENERAL APPEARANCE. The Great Dane combines in its distinguished appearance dignity, strength and elegance with great size and a powerful, well-formed, smoothly muscled body. He is one of the giant breeds, but is unique in that his general conformation must be so well balanced that he never appears clumsy and is always a unit--the Apollo of dogs. He must be spirited and courageous--never timid. He is friendly and dependable. This physical and mental combination is the characteristic which gives the Great Dane the majesty possessed by no other breed. It is particularly true of this breed that there is an impression of great masculinity in dogs as compared to an impression of great femininity in bitches. The male should appear more massive t…

The Great Dane Standard Through the Ages Part II ~1945~

The Official Illustrated Standard of the Great Dane Club of America, INC. 1945
(Typed for easy reading below each picture which has made this post EXTREMELY long. Also, you *should* be able to click on the pictures to enlarge, but sadly still not enough to read the charts.)


BREEDERS CODED OF ETHICS as endorsed by THE GREAT DANE CLUB OF AMERICA
There are only five recognize colors; all these basically fall into four color strains: 1 FAWN and BRINDLE, 2. HARLEQUIN and HARLEQUIN bred BLACK, 3. BLUE and BLUE bred BLACK, 4. BLACK. Color classifications being well founded, the Great Dane Club of America, Inc. considers it an inadvisable practice to mix color strains and it is the club's policy to adhere to the following matings:
------------------------------------------------------------------------ FAWN TO FAWN OR BRINDLE ONLY
BRINDLE TO BRINDLE OR FAWN ONLY
Pedigrees of FAWN or BRINDLED Danes should not carry HARLEQUIN, BLACK or BLUE upon them -------------------------------------------…

The Great Dane Standard Through the Ages Part IV ~1995~

(This is the last and current Standard)

The Great Dane Illustrated Standard Approved and Published by the Great Dane Club of America, Inc. September 1995, Illustrations by Stephen J. Hubbel
An Illustrated Standard And Guide for the Evaluation of the Great Dane This booklet has been prepared by The Great Dane Club of America to assist fanciers, breeders and judges in their assessment and understanding of desired Great Dane type. Nothing in the discussions or illustrations contained herein should be construed as altering or contradicting the provisions of the Official Standard of the Great Dane adopted by this club and approved by The American Kennel Club. It is rather to be considered as a supplement to, and expansion on, the Official Standard.
The reader should remember the Official Standard describes the ideal Great Dane. In the following commentary we discus common deviations from that ideal, and the relative importance to be place on such deviations in the overall evaluation of an in…