Skip to main content

Weekend Recap

This past weekend wasn't quite as busy as last weekend (which I realize I have yet to blog in detail about. Whoops!)

On Saturday, we went swimming at a new swimming hole, mainly b/c our normal swimming hole is quite the drive and there was a threat of rain/thunderstorms. We had hoped that by going to one a tad closer, it may afford us a little more swimming time. As it turned out, we had nothing to worry about and spent all day swimming. It did rain a couple of times, but no thunder was heard or lightening seen. We did get a few giggles out of the people that raced out of the water, soaking wet, to hide under the picnic pavilion or their cars. Seriously people? Were you afraid to get wet? LOL

On Sunday we had another great sermon on Christian Traditions.

We read Exodus 20:8-11

Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy.
Six days shalt thou labour, and do all they work:
But the seventh day is the sabbath of the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates:
For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.

and Mark 2:23-27.

And it came to pass, that he went through the corn fields on the sabbath day; and his disciples began, as they went, to pluck the ears of corn.
And the Pharisees said unto him, Behold, why do they on the sabbath day that which is not lawful?
And he said unto them: Have ye never read what David did, when he had need, and was ahungred, he, and they that were with him?
How he went into the house of God in the days of Abiather the high priest, and did eat the showbread, which was not lawful to eat but for the priests, and gave also to them which were with him?
And he said unto them, The sabbath was made for man, and not man made for the sabbath.

And just a few of my notes, which may not make any sense, LOL:

Sabbath is Saturday.
Lord's day is Sunday.

Letter of the Law or Spirit of the Law.
1. Refocus your faith.
2. Replenish your spirit.
3. Refresh your mind.
4. Recoup your body.
5. Regroup your family.

Sunday after Church, we headed south for the Cabbage Patch Nursery:

Here's a teaser pic, but you'll have to wait for the detailed (well, as detailed
as I can get) post later on in the week. :-D

So not quite as action packed as last weekend but still just as memorable and enjoyable. :-)

(Just a quick note pertaining to the title of this "series", after consulting with my graphic designer (aka Mom), we've come to the conclusion that making a catchy graphic with the words "Weekend Recap" just can't be done. SO, a new name, along with a graphic is in the works. Not that anyone cares, just thought I'd mention it. :-D )

Comments

  1. Hehehe you crack me up with you quick notes. :D Also the part about people running to hide when it rains....... uhhh really? Crazy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. :-P is all I have to say...err....do to that comment LOL

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Great Dane Standard Through the Ages Part III ~1976~

The 1976 Official Illustrated Standard
Revised & Edited by The Great Dane Club of America, Inc. Written text AKC approved August 10, 1976 Illustrated by Donald E. Gauther - Great Dane Breeder & Judge Copyright, 1972


1. GENERAL CONFORMATION (a) GENERAL APPEARANCE. The Great Dane combines in its distinguished appearance dignity, strength and elegance with great size and a powerful, well-formed, smoothly muscled body. He is one of the giant breeds, but is unique in that his general conformation must be so well balanced that he never appears clumsy and is always a unit--the Apollo of dogs. He must be spirited and courageous--never timid. He is friendly and dependable. This physical and mental combination is the characteristic which gives the Great Dane the majesty possessed by no other breed. It is particularly true of this breed that there is an impression of great masculinity in dogs as compared to an impression of great femininity in bitches. The male should appear more massive t…

The Great Dane Standard Through the Ages Part II ~1945~

The Official Illustrated Standard of the Great Dane Club of America, INC. 1945
(Typed for easy reading below each picture which has made this post EXTREMELY long. Also, you *should* be able to click on the pictures to enlarge, but sadly still not enough to read the charts.)


BREEDERS CODED OF ETHICS as endorsed by THE GREAT DANE CLUB OF AMERICA
There are only five recognize colors; all these basically fall into four color strains: 1 FAWN and BRINDLE, 2. HARLEQUIN and HARLEQUIN bred BLACK, 3. BLUE and BLUE bred BLACK, 4. BLACK. Color classifications being well founded, the Great Dane Club of America, Inc. considers it an inadvisable practice to mix color strains and it is the club's policy to adhere to the following matings:
------------------------------------------------------------------------ FAWN TO FAWN OR BRINDLE ONLY
BRINDLE TO BRINDLE OR FAWN ONLY
Pedigrees of FAWN or BRINDLED Danes should not carry HARLEQUIN, BLACK or BLUE upon them -------------------------------------------…

The Great Dane Standard Through the Ages Part IV ~1995~

(This is the last and current Standard)

The Great Dane Illustrated Standard Approved and Published by the Great Dane Club of America, Inc. September 1995, Illustrations by Stephen J. Hubbel
An Illustrated Standard And Guide for the Evaluation of the Great Dane This booklet has been prepared by The Great Dane Club of America to assist fanciers, breeders and judges in their assessment and understanding of desired Great Dane type. Nothing in the discussions or illustrations contained herein should be construed as altering or contradicting the provisions of the Official Standard of the Great Dane adopted by this club and approved by The American Kennel Club. It is rather to be considered as a supplement to, and expansion on, the Official Standard.
The reader should remember the Official Standard describes the ideal Great Dane. In the following commentary we discus common deviations from that ideal, and the relative importance to be place on such deviations in the overall evaluation of an in…